Woman Driver Perseveres in Trucking and Provides for Her Family

Woman Driver Perseveres in Trucking and Provides for Her Family

May 04 2018

over the road truck driving job

When truck driver Andrea decided to take a regional trucking job with J.B. Hunt, she gave the company nothing but her best and in return, earned the Driver of the Month award and a bonus for reaching one million safe miles, participated in the Arkansas Truck Driving Championship and most importantly, was able to provide for her nieces and nephew. Andrea and her mother stepped in to take custody over the children after her sister passed away.

Andrea’s Struggle and Success Story:

After joining the workforce at the age of 10, Andrea grew up juggling multiple jobs to help provide for her family. Her father, who drove trucks after retiring from the Navy, always encouraged her to get her CDL A. It wasn’t until he passed away from cancer that she decided to pursue a single, long-term career in trucking. Unfortunately, it proved to be a harder transition than she expected.

Upon receiving her commercial license, Andrea was hired by a large trucking company. It was a rocky start, however, and almost ended Andrea’s career before it began. She decided to give driving another chance at a smaller company based out of Virginia, where she grew to love driving. She eventually joined J.B. Hunt in 2007 and recently celebrated her 10th anniversary with the company this past August.

In 2008, Andrea faced another set of challenges when a stroke left her sister Cathy unable to care for her three children – Dmitri, Davena and Dreana. Andrea and her mother soon began raising the three children full time – no easy feat with the youngest being only nine months old and the oldest having Asperger syndrome, a form of autism.

regional truck driving job

For several years, Andrea worked to financially provide for her family and adjusted her work schedule to spend more time at home. Sadly, her sister passed away in 2012, leaving Andrea and her mother to share custody of the kids.

Despite their struggles and with their grandmother’s support, Andrea and her spouse have maintained a happy home life where the kids are growing and thriving. Each child is currently forming dreams of their own – Dmitri wants to teach other kids with Asperger’s, Davena hopes to become a singer, and Dreana aims to be a writer and photographer.

Although her life may not look like how she imagined, Andrea has no regrets. “I am happy with where I am and am thankful through it all, regardless,” she said.

Andrea’s positive attitude and kindness toward others make her stand out at J.B. Hunt. Her former fleet manager Jennifer speaks highly of the veteran woman driver. “I just love her attitude…. she truly loves what she does. I couldn’t think of a better person to not only represent J.B. Hunt but also women in the trucking industry. She’s the whole package!” she said.

_____

Ready to work with a company that appreciates your perseverance on and off the road? Call 1-877-791-9458 or visit DriveJBHunt.com to learn about over the roadregional or local truck driving jobs and contract opportunities or fill out our short form online.

Share in top social networks!

No responses yet

Meet J.B. Hunt’s Safe Million Mile Truck Drivers – Part 2

Meet J.B. Hunt’s Safe Million Mile Truck Drivers – Part 2

Apr 16 2018

We are excited to host numerous safe company drivers at J.B. Hunt’s Million Mile Celebration in Lowell, Ark. from April 23-24. We’ll be celebrating the milestones of our 2 million, 3 million and 4 million mile safe drivers and their dedication to their J.B. Hunt jobs!

We had the opportunity to chat with a few of our million mile safe drivers who are excited to attend the Million Mile Celebration. Read further to learn more about our safe drivers!

_______________

James T.

James or “JT” a 2 Million Mile Intermodal driver from Illinois. He’s been driving with J.B. Hunt for 20 years. 

Where were you when you found out you hit your Two Million Mile mark?
I was actually at a friend’s house, checking the app and finalizing it. I had just gotten back from my parents. They congratulated me. I called my parents and said, “I did it!”

It was one of those things that I didn’t set out to do.

How did it feel to reach your Million Mile mark?
I felt relieved. There was a lot of achievement going into it that I was little upset by, but when the dust cleared on that, I was relieved. I didn’t even set out for my first million miles. It was a relief.

When I was a year out, I was actually a trainer and I stepped down. Everybody thought I would go back to being a trainer. I said, “No, I was a trainer for 10 years, and that part of my life, I think, had come to a close, and it’s time to go into a different phase of life.”

Who was the first person you told?
I got on the app, and it was a husband and wife that were friends of mine, and I turned to them and said, “Whoa. Huh. What. It’s official. I’m two million miles. Two million, eight hundred and something and another.” The guy looked at me and said, “Wow. And we’re the first.” I said, “Yeah, I have to call my parents now. They’re going to be mad because you’re the first and they’re the second.” Dad started laughing and Mom was happy that they couldn’t take it away from me. I said, “Yeah, I know.”

I’m the only one in my family that drives. It was more or less that I was dating a gal at the time when I got into trucking. She said, “Well, you work at a golf course. That’s great, but you’re going to have to do something more.” Schneider went by at that time and said, “Well, I have always wanted to try driving a truck. It doesn’t require a degree.” She said, “Well, that’s a good start.” She had a CDL manual in my hand almost the next day. It’s ironic, because that little relationship didn’t work out very well, but here I am.

I was in a lodge, I think almost the next month in November, I walked up to a fraternity brother of mine and said, “Well, I did it.” He said, “You did what?” I said, “Remember what I told you about when we were still in training for Schneider?” He said, “Oh, you did the two million?” I thought it was all said and done and we got to announce it to the lodge. He stood up and said, “Brother JT, stand up.” I stood up. He said, “I would like to formally recognize Brother JT has accomplished two million miles accident-free in the transportation industry and he’s part of the elite.” I started crying at that point. That was not what I expected.

One of my best friends came up to me after that and said, “You did it.” I said, “Yeah, I’m sorry that I didn’t tell you sooner.” He goes, “No, I imagine you have been busy.” I go, “Yeah, I have been busy.” He goes, “What’s next?” I said, “I think I go down to Lowell next. I’m not sure if it’s this year, or when I go down to Lowell next.” He goes, “Wow, I wish I could accomplishment something like that. And I say, “Well, I didn’t set out to do this.”

I get a kick out of how I didn’t want to be in transportation for as long as I have been, but I have learned that success habits breed success habits. If you apply success habits to any industry, sooner or later you will arrive at the highest level. That’s the laws of competition, and it even works in trucking.

What advice do you have for newcomers who are thinking “Wow, that’s a long way out, probably not for me.”
Number one piece of advice, is something that I had to do – Everything you think you might know about trucking, throw it out. The second one is find those who are where you are at and go associate. Always associate up. Have some intestinal fortitude because you’re going to go through some junk because they’re going to give you all kind of hassling about it.

But it’s like anything else. If you want to be a professional swimmer or Olympic swimmer, go to any coach. Look for Bob Bowman because he coached Michael Phelps. You search for the best and search it out, and what they tell you to do, you do it, and that’s what I did. Chris, Don Hen, they were some of my biggest fans. Chris still works for us and he’s going for his three million miles. Michael Bennington is going for his four million, I believe. That’s who I associated with. It is possible, you just can’t hang out with the guys who go, “I can’t do it.” Because you won’t either.

What has driving taught you about yourself? And about life in general?
The biggest lesson that I had to learn, and it was a humbling one, was no matter where God puts you, that’s where he puts you. It might not be where you want to be, but it’s where you have to be. I had a lot of growing up to do. I had a lot of changing to do. I had to heal some emotional wounds from school. I was told that I would never accomplish anything if I didn’t go to college. I hated school, so I went for something that you didn’t have to have a degree for.

Ironically, during my training years, I trained a lot of people who had a lot of education but didn’t know how to apply it. And through street smarts, I had to teach them street smarts to help them apply it. All the books and everything that I have read throughout my life, it was a way of connecting with people and polling them. I had to find out what made the person tick, what brought them into transportation, connect and then we’ll have a poll. If you did something that was out of their vernacular, you had to find out what interested them and see if you know anything about the subject. Connect, poll. Connect, poll. That was something that I learned to do being a trainer, and I almost had Trainer of the Year in Chicago a couple of times.

It’s all about association, and I had to learn that the hard way. When I started out in the trucking, I hung around with people who were badmouthing everything because that’s what I grew up with. At the time, I was reading a Robert Schuller book and he said tough times never last, but tough people do. If you’re hanging around negative, negative stuff will happen, so I had to stop that. I applied that, and by the time I got to J.B. Hunt, I asked Safety, “OK, who are your Million Milers?” And they listed off about five people, and they have been my friends ever since. That’s being humble. I was not a humble person and that was hard.

What do you want readers (corporate and the general public) to know about truck drivers?
We’re people just like you. You have a bad element in every industry that makes everybody look bad. Don’t judge the whole by a few. I have met people from all walks of life. As a trainer, I met people from all countries. The best part about it was when you hear negative stuff about a country, you meet somebody from that country and they become your friend, and you can throw everything else out.

Why do you drive with J.B. Hunt?
When I first heard about J.B Hunt back in 1992, I was scared to death of it. I didn’t like the speed limit, I didn’t want to be harassed. When they announced 40 cents per mile, Dad said, “Go, try them.” I said, “It’s smoke and mirrors, Dad. Transportation is lying and thieving.” He said, “Try it. They have got that 40 cents per mile. Try it. Humble yourself a little bit, pretend you don’t know everything, and try it.” I said, “It’s smoke and mirrors, but I’ll do it.”

I got into orientation, and I think Paul Richardson, who was in safety at the time, he called me a jerk. I was so negative. He goes, “Your first pay check is going to blow you out of the water.” I’m like, “Yeah, right, whatever.” And then, wow, my first pay check with this company changed my mind.

I actually went up to Paul and said, “I’m sorry I was so negative in class.” He was, “I don’t think negative quite covers it.” I go, “I’m sorry.” And he goes, “Why?’ And I said, “Truck driving is lying and thieving. It’s two logbooks to barely make a living. It’s swearing, bad language, bad body odor, a 300-pound guy that doesn’t know how to speak English correctly. That’s transportation. That’s what I was exposed to before I got here.” And he has a professionalism. He walked the walk and he can back it up and that’s impressive.

He was like, “Not everybody comes to me and apologizes, so apology accepted.” I actually became friends with a lot of the people in safety. I think back and think, “Man, I was a jerk.” I had to go through that, I guess. I’m still a jerk on some days.

The greatest shift in my life was to change my mind on that. I love it when somebody can put enough information in front of me to change my mind on something. I love that…

_______________

Carl Z. 

Carl Z cropped

Carl is a dedicated 2 Million Mile truck driver from Texas and has been driving with J.B. Hunt for nearly 23 years!

Where were you when you found out you hit your 2 Million Mile mark?
I was coming in to get my pick-up number, and I asked where about I was on the two million miles, and he pulled it up, and he said, ‘I think we’re about there.’

So, you knew you were pretty close?
Yeah, I knew I was close in March, and it was April, so I just asked how close we were and said we are already there. 

Yeah, when I found out I had my one million miles, they just walked in and shook my hand. I was confused, and he said I was a one million mile driver.

Did you know you were even close?
No, I didn’t even know I was close to one million miles because before I got the one million, I had three preventable accidents.  It took quite awhile to get that one.

So, would you say your first million was a bigger deal then your second million?
Yeah, it took 11 years and nine months to get it.  And 10 years to get my two million.   

How did it feel to reach your 2 Million Mile mark?
I was excited. Glad to have something to show for the time I put in.

Who was the first person you told?
One of my fellow drivers that I talk to all the time. 

Did you call your family after that?
I didn’t call right after that, I waited until I got home then I told them.  They don’t understand what one million miles or two million miles for drivers mean.

What advice do you have for newcomers who are thinking “Wow, that’s a long way out, probably not for me.”
Well, I just tell them to never get in a hurry. Drive a truck like a truck not a sports car and you’ll have a good chance of making it to a million miles, but of course you gotta be committed to wanting to stay driving a truck for the rest of your life to get it. I see a lot of drivers get in a hurry and make mistakes.

What has driving taught you about yourself? And about life in general?
It’s definitely taught me how to be a better driver and things to look for that I don’t look for when I’m driving. Patience.

What do you want readers (corporate and the general public) to know about truck drivers?
Well, one thing the public would need to know is, I catch a lot of people passing me on the right and a lot of them don’t know you can’t see them.  I see that all the time.  Also, how hard it is to get a million safe miles. My family isn’t into truck driving, but I got a father who used to be a truck driver. Well, he used to be a truck driver since I was a little baby.  I got started because of him.

Why do you drive with J.B. Hunt?
At the time, they had a driving school- them and Schneider. And I went to school (1995) in Alexandria, Louisiana and that’s how I got started. I decided to stay. In 1996, they did away with that driving school and then they gave all drivers a big raise, 20 to 30 cents, which back then for the kind of truck driving work we did was good pay, so I decided to stay. And I was able to save up enough money in three years and four months to buy myself a house, but I had no family to support back then. I lived with my brother and we paid both half of the utility bills and stuff and it was real cheap for us to live, so I was able to save up money to do stuff with. And making 33 cents per mile, which was good pay, I saved up a good amount of money because I didn’t have any bills to pay.

What would you say you’re most proud of?
For one thing, I’ve never had a job for 22 and a half years, and I’ve been able to manage to keep this one and actually make it to two million miles.

On my 30th birthday, my trainer took me to Denny’s and bought me a steak dinner.  By the time I was 30, I was out on the road with my first trainer. 

_______________

Tony W. 

Tony is a dedicated 3 Million Mile driver from Texas and has been driving with J.B. Hunt for nearly 26 years!

Where were you when you found out you hit your Million Mile mark?
I think I was at the Odessa yard, out there at the Family Dollar DCS yard. They told me there in the office. 

How did it feel to reach your Million Mile mark?
One million miles was exciting and the two was more like, good money there. Yeah, it was still great. I felt accomplished. Three million, I don’t know if I’ll go for four or not. I may retire by then.

Three is better than two, that’s for sure. So, three is more exciting than two.

Who was the first person you told?
I think it was probably Andrew Clark. He was the operations manager at the Family Dollar. Now he’s in safety as a supervisor in the Dallas area.

What advice do you have for newcomers who are thinking “Wow, that’s a long way out, probably not for me.”
J.B. Hunt’s got a lot to offer, you know? A lot of DCS. Just keep going one mile at a time. You got that phone app and you can keep up with how many miles you got. You can check it as you get closer. One mile at a time. Don’t even think about it, just drive. Just do your job and don’t even think about it until you realize, hey, I got 100,000, I got 500,000. If I keep this up in four or five years, I could get one million.

What has driving taught you about yourself? And about life in general?
It teaches me that I’m responsible for this truck and trailer. This is my money maker. If I take care of my truck and trailer, do my pre-trip and post trip, make sure it’s in good and great condition, I’m making money every day.  It’s taught me to respect my driving skills and keep myself calm and not to get mad. I’m going to get there one day. I might be 30 minutes late, but I’ll get to the customer.

Maybe when I do retire, maybe I want to be a driver instructor. New kids coming out of school, you know, maybe a high school driver instructor. Teach them about truck driving and how to deal with them. When I was a kid, I didn’t think about truck driving. I just pass them and go on down the road and don’t worry about it. I didn’t know what a blind side was and all this stuff, getting in their blind spot.

I’m a better person than I was when I first started J.B. Hunt. When I’m driving a big rig and have more responsibility, and you mature as a person. 

What do you want readers (corporate and the general public) to know about truck drivers?
We are human. We are not robots. We do our best to drive and stay on schedule.

We want you to understand the drivers’ hours of service. When hours of service first went into effect, with 14 hours of service, many dispatchers didn’t know how it actually worked. I start my day at 6 a.m. in the morning and they want me to deliver a load at nine o’clock at night, ya know? That’s 15 hours later and that’s messing with my 14 hours work.

I’d like people to understand how the truck operates. Especially young drivers getting their license, have them talk to a truck driver. Or have a truck driver go through a driving school and teach them a little bit about truck driving. They can understand what a truck driver is… I would like to have a video, when you are getting your driver’s license there, while you are standing in line waiting there getting your driver’s license, having some kind of video showing a truck driver driving down the road, giving them an idea of how trucks are… get people out here to understand truck driving.

Why do you drive with J.B. Hunt?
I always wanted to drive a truck when I was young. I’d daydream a lot in school and I had a chance. I started off the old way. Nobody in my family drove a truck. My step father did it for a couple years and got promoted and worked for a big oil field company … I started off working at a warehouse. They had trucks there, so I knew I could learn. When we would have a slow day, I could probably learn how to drive a truck there and sure enough, that’s what happened. I started driving for Ashley’s Furniture. That was more of a small truck and then my last job, before I came to J.B. Hunt, was a gasoline truck… then I thought, you know, I’m divorced, the kids are taken care of, I’m going to go over the road. I’m gonna try it and J.B. Hunt was the first to give me a chance. When I went in to talk to someone, his name was Frank, he’s no longer with us, he told me, you need to go to truck driving school and all that. And I said that’s right, so I do that. I was on four weeks later and I was trained for five weeks and it’s 26 years that I’ve been by myself.

Other comments:
It’s a great company. They treat me well and I do my job the best that I can, like it’s my own vehicle. Drive safe and save the company money.

_______________

Mike K.

Mike is a dedication 2 Million Mile driver from Texas and has been with J.B. Hunt for nearly 19 years!

Where were you when you found out you hit your Million Mile mark?
I was inside the office talking to the boss and he said, ‘You’re 1,000 miles from hitting your two million miles,’ and I said, ‘What did you tell me that for?  Now you put the stress level on me.’  But I think I was coming out of Dallas when I hit my two million miles. 

How did it feel to reach your Million Mile mark?
It was overwhelming. I got a little teary-eyed. I said, ‘Man, I did it.’  I knew I did it and the dispatcher went ‘You did it, man.’  I said ‘Yeah, I know.’  Then I told my wife and I called her, it was pretty exciting. 

Who was the first person you told?
My wife was the first person. She said, ‘I’m so proud of you!’ You know the first million was pretty exciting and the second million, she had a big smile on her face and gave me a big hug when I got home. 

What advice do you have for newcomers who are thinking “Wow, that’s a long way out, probably not for me.”
A lot of them are young. Just stay with it. Just keep a good positive attitude and it’ll come. I can’t believe I’ve been after it almost 20 years.  It’s gone by quick.  We go through good and bad out there. My wife kept me here, she did.  It got slow about my third year, and I thought, I can’t do this.  Just stick it out and it got better. J.B. Hunt is a good company. Excellent maintenance, that’s what I like.

What has driving taught you about yourself? And about life in general?
Well, I know trucks move America. Without trucks, we don’t make it. I’m very safety conscious. I got grandkids, myself. Just never get in a hurry. You’re operating a monster. Patience- don’t get in a hurry. At times we get hung up, but you just got to be patient.

What do you want readers (corporate and the general public) to know about truck drivers?
We’re all human beings. People are so impatient with truck drivers out here. Having dispatchers ride with the drivers to show them exactly what we are going through out here, especially dealing with Budweiser, you better have patience over there. It’s always busy and they’re very safety conscious inside that plant and don’t screw up or they’ll throw you out of the plant. Once you are out of that plant, you aren’t going back in and you are out of a job. You better know what you’re doing, better have some patience. They are very nice people and they know we’re loaded, too.

Why do you drive with J.B. Hunt?
Because I knew it was a good company. One of the drivers I worked with in the prison said, ‘Why don’t you go drive with J.B. Hunt?’  I said, ‘Aww man, they wouldn’t hire me.’  He said, ‘You are a good driver, go apply with them.’  And I did, and I got on. But it was a lot tighter with driving experience when I came over here. When I hired on, it was three to five years of experience. They knew I had the experience. 

Maintenance department is unreal. They could build a truck. I wish I could do something for them, like bring donuts. That’s how good they are. Great shop! They keep us going, the diesel truck. They’re the unsung hero.

_______________

Kevin R.

Kevin is a dedicated 2 Million Mile driver from New Jersey and has been driving with J.B. Hunt for 27 years.

Where were you when you found out you hit your Million Mile mark?
At my current account, C&S Wholesale, updating my ETA. The DRIVE app actually told me first.

How did it feel to reach your Million Mile mark?
Second million was basically a goal I wanted to get done because I planned on doing something once I hit the two million – transferring to an office – but I’m still driving a truck. I’m going to stick out for another… well, right now I got my 21 years safe driving.  When I hit 25, I’m going to decide that part. I’m thinking of looking at a safety position or something like that. 

Who was the first person you told?
That’s a hard question, because on the J.B. Hunt work group, I posted a message there and a Facebook message to my family and stuff, so basically, over a hundred people found out.

What advice do you have for newcomers who are thinking “Wow, that’s a long way out, probably not for me.”
I guess my only advice is drive your first mile like your last mile. Use the Smith System to the best of your ability, and above all, take your time. There’s no rushing involved.

What has driving taught you about yourself? And about life in general?
As far as the company goes, the company has changed quite a lot since I first started. That’s for sure. And as far as the people and the public out there, some pay attention to the surroundings, and others are oblivious to what’s going on around them.  

What do you want readers (corporate and the general public) to know about truck drivers?
As far as industry goes, I guess we all have a job to play. We help move America, feed America, clothe America, no matter what division, what type of job you do. No matter what position you do, we’re all out there for one thing only and that’s to serve the public. Drivers like the freedom of the room and not being stuck to the desk, basically.

Why do you drive with J.B. Hunt?
Plain and simple. It’s the best transportation company in the world. By far, in my opinion.

_______________

Interested in driving with J.B. Hunt and reaching millions of safe miles? Call 1-877-791-9458 to learn more about our regionalover the road and local truck driving jobs or fill out our short form and we’ll contact you.

Share in top social networks!

No responses yet

Meet J.B. Hunt’s Safe Million Mile Truck Drivers – Part I

Meet J.B. Hunt’s Safe Million Mile Truck Drivers – Part I

Apr 09 2018

This Spring, J.B. Hunt will be recognizing numerous safe company drivers at our Million Mile Celebration in Lowell, Ark. We are excited to have our 2 million, 3 million and 4 million mile drivers here and celebrate their hard work and dedication to their J.B. Hunt jobs and driving safely.

We had the opportunity to chat with a few of our million mile safe drivers who are excited to attend the Million Mile Celebration. Read further to meet our safe drivers!

_______________

Terry W.

Terry is a 2 Million Mile Intermodal driver from California. He’s been driving with J.B. Hunt for 26 years.

Where were you when you found out you hit your Million Mile mark? Talk to me about what was going through your mind.
I was here at South Gate. As drivers, we know we’re getting close to that milestone and we all start getting nervous. I reached mine in January of 2017 on my 25th anniversary. I hugged and thanked every one of those dispatchers upstairs and told them I couldn’t have done it without them. If I didn’t have people from here to Arkansas supporting me, I wouldn’t be here today -again- it is a team effort. One thing J.B. Hunt does well is they recognize their employees. If you put in your dedication and your time, they recognize it. I could cover a wall with the plaques and certificates I’ve received over the years. I don’t know any other company that does that.

Who was the first person you told?
I called my kids. My daughter is my biggest fan when it comes to J.B. Hunt. My two sons are just as happy. Then I called my siblings and they all just congratulated me to death. Through the years, they have been so supportive of me. Family is everything.

What advice do you have for newcomers who are thinking ‘Wow, that’s a long way out, how can I ever get there?”
Ironically I have been given that opportunity here at South Gate. I get to have a class with the new drivers and go over the J.B. Hunt handbook with them. A lot of the guys are the same age as I was when I started and I tell them, ‘First of all, welcome to J.B. Hunt. This is the beginning of something that will provide you with everything you need to be successful throughout your career. I was you 26 years ago. I never looked too far ahead and I took it one day at a time.

What has driving taught you about yourself?
I come from a small town called Liberty, MO, just 20 miles north of Kansas City. It had a population of 13,000 people when I was a kid. Truck driving was never a plan for a young kid back then. Driving has taught me how to be responsible and that I can be successful in life doing something other find hard to do.

What has driving taught you about life in general?
It has taught me that no matter what you choose to do in life, just be successful. It’s a very hard profession but very rewarding at the same time. I’ve spent half of my life driving for J.B. Hunt. The places I’ve been, the people I’ve met and the people I’ve worked with and for…it just seems to come full-circle.

Lots of people from corporate and the field are going to read this. What do you want them to know about drivers?
To the people in Arkansas, I’d like to thank each and every person there. Throughout my career with J.B. Hunt, corporate has been right there when I needed them. Payroll, Claims, Road Service, HR – they were always there at the ready whenever I had an issue. We have a wonderful team at J.B. Hunt. I can’t wait to meet everyone in April!

_______________

Bob P. 

Bob is a 4 Million Mile over the road automotive truck driver from West Virginia. He’s been with J.B. Hunt for 30 years.

Where were you when you found out you hit your Million Mile mark?
I was at the Louisville yard down there. I just pulled in after making deliveries down there.

How did it feel to reach your Million Mile mark?
It was kind of overwhelming in a way. In a way it was a big relief off my shoulders. I knew I was close because the week before, we were running to Dorado and back out of Louisville down there. I only had like 250 miles when I left to go to Dorado.

It was a bigger accomplishment… I never thought that I’d make it that far. Traffic keeps getting worse and worse and everything. It’s harder and harder every day.

Who was the first person you told?
The account manager John. I walked up to him after my manager told me that I made it. He was the first one I saw outside out there.
The week after, when I came back in the next week, they had a celebration. They had cake and balloons and food and all the stuff. They had a big spread there in the office. It made me feel real good. They had a big banner outside and there was my name on it and all that.

What advice do you have for newcomers who are thinking ‘Wow, that’s a long way out, how can I ever get there?”
You can do it. You just have to stay positive and work hard at it. Watch everything you do, be very safe. Just be careful, that’s all I can say. Watch everything you do, double check everything you do… Don’t take chances.

What has driving taught you about yourself? And about life in general?
It’s given me more control over doing things and being more aware of the general public and everything going on around.

What do you want readers (corporate and the general public) to know about truck drivers? 
It’s a rough job driving a truck. We give up a lot of home time and time away from our families and people don’t realize what we give up to do this job. The home time is the main thing, the time with your family, being away all the time.

Why do you drive with J.B. Hunt?
It’s a good company. It’s a decent living. I enjoy the people that I work for down there in Louisville on that account. They are extremely good people to work for and with. If you got anything that you need to be off for or time off at home, something pops up, they make sure that they get you home on time. You need to stop in the middle of something, they’ll take your load and get somebody… they’ll get you home. They are a great group of people.

_______________

Dan W.

Dan is a 2 Million Mile over the road automotive truck driver from Indiana. He’s been with the company for 23 years!

Where were you when you found out you hit your Million Mile mark? 
I knew I hit it before I got the call from corporate because I keep track of my miles. I was at the house and double checking everything. I got my call from corporate on my way back from a load. I keep track of my miles and know what I needed to make it to two million.

I looked at my wife and said if my figures are correct, after I triple checked them, I’m a thousand miles over my two million.

How did it feel to reach your Million Mile mark?
I was very happy and my wife was very proud. She kept egging me on, saying you can do it, just keep going. And I did. It’s an accomplishment. You don’t think you’re gonna make it.

I worked hard at it, so I’m very proud of myself.

What advice do you have for newcomers who are thinking ‘Wow, that’s a long way out, how can I ever get there?”
Don’t give up. Just don’t give up, period. If you say that it’s never going to happen, then you won’t do it. It won’t happen. If you tell yourself, I can do this. And you have somebody else with you that says, you can do this. Like my wife can say, you can do this, just keep going. I did it! I’ve done what I set out to do. I made a goal. I got it. That’s all they gotta do, is set that goal and keep after it. It will all work out in the end. They just have to keep trying. That’s all there is to it.

Take your time. Don’t hurry. Don’t get upset. Pay attention. Do what you’re supposed to.

What has driving taught you about yourself? And about life in general?
I can do what I set out to do… I learned to do the job and do it the right way.

[Life] is never simple. There’s always some underlining problem that will pop up and try to throw you for a loop. And if you just, you know, relax, pay attention and follow through with what you’re supposed to do, it will all work out.

What do you want readers (corporate and the general public) to know about truck drivers?
There are a lot of us out there just trying to do our job, making it from day to day, get home to our families. We don’t want anybody hurt. Not trying to run people off the road. Give us the same chance that you want us to give you.

Why do you drive with J.B. Hunt?
The money is good. The pay is always right and I get to go places.

_______________

Howard W.

Howard is a 2 Million Mile over the road automotive truck driver from Kentucky.  He’s been with J.B. Hunt for almost 30 years!

Where were you when you found out you hit your Million Mile mark?
I was on my way out west when my dispatcher let me know that.

How did it feel to reach your Million Mile mark?
It was awesome! I’m working on all of it because if it’s God’s will… I can’t take nothing away from him. If it wasn’t for him, where would I be at? I can’t do nothing without my Lord heavenly father. That’s what kept me going. He’s in control of my life completely. Without him, I don’t know what I would do because you know what, he brought me through the end of Vietnam and I got my limbs, I got my health, and I’m thankful and I’m blessed.

Who was the first person you told?
I told my wife and then my wife called my mom and then my mom said, ‘Has he stopped yet?’ and she said, ‘I think he has,’ so she sent me a message and I said, yes, I’ve already stopped. She said that your momma wants you to call her. And as soon as I said hello, she said, ‘Congratulations! I knew you could make it!’ I said, okay, you are more happy than I am!

What advice do you have for newcomers who are thinking ‘Wow, that’s a long way out, how can I ever get there?”
First thing I would tell them is get on your knees and pray like everything that is your first, is your last. The Lord will walk in front of you and help you to meet your goal. When you take your eyes off of him, what do we do? We fall. When we are not focusing on him, how can we give advise to somebody else if we are not focusing on him? He says follow me, keep your eyes on me.

As I travel down the highway, each car that passes me, that’s my family, so I’m going to do everything I can to protect them and to protect myself.

Your five keys, use them. They will protect you and they will help you to meet your goal. Without my keys, without the training with J.B. Hunt, I would just be like a regular driver out here… Get the big picture, aim high steering, keep your eyes moving, leave yourself an out, make sure that they see you.

What has driving taught you about yourself? And about life in general?
It taught me to be patient. It taught me that whatever I do, don’t look at the first thing that comes at you and think that you have got it. It taught me to be patient and use one of my five keys, to get the big picture of everything that is in front of you and focus on your goal. It will help you to meet any type of goal that you walk up on.

It taught me to have patience with people. Don’t judge everybody just because you see them maybe one time. It taught me to accept people’s situations. You may not be able to help everybody, but it taught me to be patient, don’t get upset. You think that you know it all, but guess what, life will throw you a curve ball in a hurry. It taught me how to be patient and treat everybody how you want to be treated.

What do you want readers (corporate and the general public) to know about truck drivers?
I want them to know that all of us, we have a passion about being out here as a truck driver. If you didn’t have a passion about being out here, being a truck driver, there’s no way we would be safe and trying to keep everyone of us safe. I would want the people at the corporate office to look at me, and you know what, we have an angel of a driver out there that looks forward going down the road, but he will protect not only our company but the people around him.
As my truck is going down the road, I want them to not only look at the number of my truck, I want them to look at, he’s in that truck, that truck has got his character, so you know that we got the best out there.

Why do you drive with J.B. Hunt?
I drive with J.B. Hunt because J.B. Hunt teaches the drivers, they prepare their drivers for the future. They just don’t put their drivers out there on the highway.

J.B. Hunt is the strongest company that I have seen out here. They reach out and try to help the drivers. That’s what I like about J.B. Hunt. J.B. Hunt is a family company that will stand strong with drivers.

_______________

James G. 

James is a a 2 Million Mile Dedicated driver from Missouri. He’s been driving with J.B. Hunt for 2o years!

Where were you when you found out you hit your Million Mile mark?
I was in St. Louis when I found out. I commute out of there and that’s where I was.

How did it feel to reach your Million Mile mark?
It felt great! It was like a relief. I knew it was getting close as I had talked to our safety guy. I had it figured out and he said how many miles and I was doing the math every week. I should be getting close here. I was always waiting for something to happen. Like, something’s going to happen. You get kind of paranoid a bit but it all turned out good. It was like a relief.

Who was the first person you told?
My wife and kids live around here so as soon as I found out and came home, I told them all. They were all happy.

What advice do you have for newcomers who are thinking ‘Wow, that’s a long way out, how can I ever get there?”
Take one day at a time. Just one day at a time. I think about that and it’s a million, it’s two million, it’s 20 years. What happened? That’s all I can say is take one day at a time. Here, I’m 50 and my kids are turning old too now. You just don’t blink your eyes or else it’s going to be three million and I’m going to be 70, you know?

My safety advice is always practice safety. That’s the bottom line – practice safety and watch out for the unexpected. Be a defensive driver. Safety is the number one key to everything out there. There’s too many wrecks that you see out there on the highway and you think, how did that happen, you know? Some of them ain’t pretty, I’ve seen over these 30 some odd years. Quite a few.

What has driving taught you about yourself? And about life in general?
Before when I was young, I thought, you know they are getting ready to close the pass because of the snow. Oh, I better get out there or I’ll be sitting in this truck stop. Now, if I see a snowflake, I stop. It taught me safety. Don’t risk anything. It’s better to be safe than sorry. It’s just how I look at it.

Life can be gone in a flash. It doesn’t take much. Just like those accidents I’ve seen, nothing is for sure.

What do you want readers (corporate and the general public) to know about truck drivers?
Most of them try to do their best and most of them do practice safety… I’d say respect the truck drivers. Respect the size of the truck, as compared to a car. They can’t stop on a dime. Get by them or stay away from them… this is a big vehicle, an 80,000 pound vehicle. Little bity ol’ cars just can’t match up.         

Why do you drive with J.B. Hunt?
I’ve been here 20 years now. I don’t want another job. I can’t believe I’ve been here this long. Before that, I stayed with a company, like I said, two years at the max and I changed jobs like people change socks. And then they got me home every night. First company that ever gave me a paid vacation. The pay was decent, the working environment, the equipment was good. Couple of companies I worked with, the equipment wasn’t that good. The pay is weekly and on time. You get paid for learning safety even. They pay you for that, you know? And teaching you safety. The people I work around with, my office people, my superiors, my dispatcher, my fleet manager, my project manager – all good guys and people. They are respectful to all the drivers.

Other comments:
The company is a good company. I have a job that gets me home mostly every night, ya know? After the first 13 years of my trucking career, I was coast to coast and Canada. Then I went to just east coast and back and I wasn’t home much. Just being home, the pay was good, the company … it’s the first company, after 13 years for working for people, it’s the first company that I ever got a vacation, a paid vacation!

_______________

Johnny W.

Johnny is a dedicated truck driver from Texas. He’s been driving with J.B. Hunt for 50 years!

Where were you when you found out you hit your Million Mile mark?
I was coming in the gate at Houston.

I was coming to the yard at the end of my day, and they were all standing out there, and there was a banner out there that had congratulations on your million miles.

How did it feel to reach your 4 Million Mile mark compared to your other ones?
It was a great accomplishment.  I didn’t have to reset. It took a lot of hard work and dedication.

Who was the first person you told?
My wife.

What advice do you have for newcomers who are thinking “Wow, that’s a long way out, probably not for me.”
It’s a lot of hard work and dedication. Follow all the safety stuff that you’re given all the time and the Smith System and aim high in steering and all that. Just focus on being safe every day.

What has driving taught you about yourself? And about life in general?
The safety about it. Accidents and everything will happen, so you have to make sure you follow the guidelines and everything.

What do you want readers (corporate and the general public) to know about truck drivers?
Great career, if you like [it]. You have to really love it to do it and be successful in it. It takes a lot of hard work.

Why do you drive with J.B. Hunt?
I just decided to give it a try and they turned out to be a great company to work for. The people are really nice.

Are you still excited for the Million Mile ceremony since you have been through it two other times?
It’ll be even more exciting to come back. No, the ceremony doesn’t get old. I still really enjoy it, so it makes it even better.  

_______________

Interested in driving with J.B. Hunt and reaching millions of safe miles? Call 1-877-791-9458 to learn more about our regional, over the road and local truck driving jobs or fill out our short form and we’ll contact you.

Share in top social networks!

No responses yet

J.B. Hunt Dedicated Local and Regional Truck Driving Jobs

J.B. Hunt Dedicated Local and Regional Truck Driving Jobs

Mar 28 2018

Dedicated truck driving

At J.B. Hunt, dedicated company drivers enjoy a selection of local and regional jobs that add variety to their days with a mix of truck driving and non-driving duties – operating forklifts, pallet jacks, lift gates, augers, material handling, installation and more.

Big and small businesses understand that managing their own fleet and transporting their products is no easy task. They see outsourcing their transportation needs as a valuable and effective solution; one that J.B. Hunt Dedicated Contract Services (DCS) drivers deliver. From straight trucks to flatbeds and temperature control, dedicated drivers provide the skill and service necessary for J.B. Hunt’s continued growth.

Local dedicated drivers typically move loads to a customer within a radius that allows them to complete their deliveries and return home the same day. Regional dedicated drivers move freight within a region that encompasses the surrounding states and are usually on the road for five days and return home on a weekly basis.

By servicing a single customer, a dedicated truck driver experiences a consistent schedule and familiarity with their route, delivery and the customer’s facility, which can lead to an increase in load efficiency and pay. A driver is also able to build a rapport with the customer and offer topnotch service.

Each account offers onsite management to aid dedicated drivers in load planning, safety training and with any customer concerns. Consistent managerial support allows drivers to grow in their roles, and many enjoy seeing their hard work make a positive effect on the customer and the account’s growth.

Mock DOT 2

All J.B. Hunt company drivers have access to comprehensive health benefit offerings including medical, dental and vision as well as life insurance, 401K and paid vacation.

Through our Hunt’s Heroes military hiring program, we also offer local and regional dedicated trucking jobs to Veterans and transitioning service members, no matter their driving experience. Since many have served away from home and their loved ones for long periods of time, local and regional truck driving jobs give Veterans the home time that they deserve.

J.B. Hunt offers dedicated driving jobs in many metro areas such as Chicago, Atlanta, Dallas and Minneapolis, as well as smaller cities such as Bethlehem, Pa., Chester, N.Y., Green Bay, Wis., and Stockton, Calif. Dedicated truck driving jobs in these areas and other areas nationwide, open and close frequently. Check our truck driving job search for an up-to-date listing of current openings.

___________

Interested in learning more about our regional and local truck driving jobs with J.B. Hunt’s Dedicated Contract Services division? Call 1-877-791-9458 or feel free to fill out our short form online and we’ll contact you.

Share in top social networks!

No responses yet

J.B. Hunt Intermodal Local And Regional Truck Driving Jobs

J.B. Hunt Intermodal Local And Regional Truck Driving Jobs

Mar 15 2018

Intermodal Double stacked Containers

At J.B. Hunt, intermodal company drivers reap the benefits of the carrier’s longstanding relationships with major rail providers – BNSF, Norfolk Southern, CSX, CN and KCS/KCSM – and its heavy presence at rail yards nationwide.

J.B. Hunt Intermodal operates the largest fleet of company-owned 53′ containers and drayage fleets in North America. With more than 90,000 containers and 78,000 chassis, and access to private express gates, J.B. Hunt drivers enjoy less wait, stronger freight and more miles.

Intermodal Container Transfer

What is intermodal?

Intermodal is the process of using two modes of transportation, such as truck and railway, to move goods from shippers to customers. Typically, a truck moves a container to a railway and/or picks up a container from a railway to be delivered to a customer.

What do intermodal truck drivers do?

Intermodal truck drivers perform traditional driving duties – transporting freight containers from rail yards to customer locations. Drivers are given pre-planned loads and primarily no-touch freight.

Local intermodal drivers typically move containers to customers within a 200-mile radius, allowing them to complete their deliveries and return home the same day. Regional intermodal drivers move containers within a region that encompasses the surrounding states and are usually on the road for five days and return home on a weekly basis.

J.B. Hunt truck drivers enjoy access to comprehensive health benefit offerings including medical, dental and vision as well as life insurance, 401K and paid vacation.

Local truck driving job

Intermodal trucking jobs for Veterans:

Through our Hunt’s Heroes military hiring program, we also offer local and regional intermodal trucking jobs to Veterans and transitioning service members, no matter their driving experience. Since many have served away from home and their loved ones for long periods of time, local and regional truck driving jobs give Veterans the home time that they deserve.

J.B. Hunt’s intermodal truck driving jobs:

J.B. Hunt offers intermodal driving jobs in many metro areas such as Portland, Chicago, Philadelphia, Dallas and Atlanta, as well as smaller cities such as Scranton, Pa., Springfield, Ill., Janesville, Wis., and Haslet, Texas. Intermodal truck driving jobs in these areas and other areas nationwide, open and close frequently. Check our truck driving job search for an up-to-date listing of current openings.

____________

____________

Interested in learning more about our regional and local truck driving jobs with J.B. Hunt’s Intermodal division? Call 1-877-791-9458 or feel free to fill out our short form online and we’ll contact you.

Share in top social networks!

No responses yet

J.B. Hunt Local Truck Driver Reaches 4 Million Safe Miles

J.B. Hunt Local Truck Driver Reaches 4 Million Safe Miles

Feb 26 2018

local truck driving job

After 30 years with J.B. Hunt, local dedicated truck driver Johnny racked up four million safe miles, and his colleagues were eager to recognize his well-earned milestone. “I pulled into the yard and everyone was in the yard. They had put a banner up at the gate… it said congratulations on your four million miles,” he said. “It was really nice. It makes me want to do better.”

Johnny first began his J.B. Hunt career with a nudge from his wife. “I was over the road at the time and my wife said, ‘Why not go to work for J.B. Hunt? It’s a good company with good benefits’,” he said. “I decided to see what it was like.”

He quickly noticed J.B. Hunt’s emphasis on safety standards throughout his training and practiced them daily. “Safety every day. Day in and day out. From the time you turn the switch on until you turn it off and get out of the truck,” he said.

Johnny drove over the road for a number of years until J.B. Hunt acquired a new customer, allowing it to offer local and dedicated driving jobs. He jumped at the opportunity and went local. “I was home every night. It was a big difference,” he explained. “I have more home time and can do things on the weekend.”

As his career rolled along, so did his safe mile count. Johnny gradually hit one, two and three million miles. “It felt good… it felt better to achieve even more,” he said. “I was just making sure that I was safe every day.”

local trucking job

When he reached two and three million safe miles, Johnny attended the Million Mile Celebrations at J.B. Hunt’s corporate office in Lowell, Ark., and plans to make an appearance this year to celebrate his four million safe miles. “It was really nice. I enjoyed it. It was very entertaining. It was my first time seeing Mr. Hunt’s office,” he said. “I’m looking forward to meeting everyone [at this year’s event].”

With every million safe miles, Johnny received safety bonuses ranging from $5,000 to $40,000. He’s put the extra cash to use. “I put it in the bank. The wife, she takes it all,” he laughed. “Most went to pay bills and we did take vacation and went on a cruise. It was my first cruise.”

local trucking job

Johnny offers advice to current J.B. Hunt drivers eager to reach one million safe miles or four million safe miles. “Work hard every day and safety first. Follow the guidelines, day in and day out. All it takes is one time to get in an accident.”

At the age of 69, Johnny still isn’t ready to retire. “I haven’t thought about it yet. My health is still good. I’ll know when it’s time,” he said. “I enjoy working for J.B. Hunt and appreciate the opportunity to do what I like and accomplish what I accomplish.”

_______________

Interested in driving with J.B. Hunt from hire to retire? Call 1-877-791-9458 to discuss over the roadregional and local truck driving jobs or fill out a short form online.

Share in top social networks!

No responses yet

Driving a Reefer vs Driving a Dry Van Trailer

Driving a Reefer vs Driving a Dry Van Trailer

Feb 19 2018

From a young age, regional truck driver John has been drawn to trucks. “In high school, I worked on trucks at a truck stop and then became an assistant shop manager,” he said. When he moved to Indiana, he couldn’t find a management job in the area, so he decided to become a truck driver. “I wanted to be outside, not in the office. I didn’t want to be cooped up between four walls,” he said. “I like being by myself, being your own boss. If you do something wrong… you can holler at yourself.”

John reefer truck2

Initially, he went over the road with a carrier who would keep him out for nine weeks at a time. But being on the road for so long didn’t equate to consistent loads or a steady income. “I was waiting on loads, I didn’t know if I’d have one,” he said. Naturally, the time away from home also put a stress on his marriage. “It took a toll on my wife. I promised not to put her through it again,” he said. “I was about to lose my home, so I called a J.B. Hunt recruiter.”

John was hired on to J.B. Hunt’s Truckload division and routed home every two weeks. “J.B. Hunt is stable. I’ll have a job tomorrow,” he said.  After a few years, he moved into a regional truck driving job that gets him home every weekend to spend time with his wife, step daughter and two chocolate labs. “I’m home on the weekends to do yard work… And we are also remodeling our house,” he said.

John eventually transitioned from pulling a dry van to a refrigerated trailer, also known as a reefer.  He quickly noticed a difference between the two types of equipment. “Dry van doesn’t have anything mechanical, it’s an empty box. The reefer has a motor on the front to keep whatever is inside warm or cold. You have to set the temp,” he explained.

Not long after, he noticed a change in how the trailer responded to his driving. “There’s extra weight on the nose, especially going around a curve or on a ramp. It likes to tilt… If a ramp says 45 miles per hour, with a van, you go 30 to 35. With a reefer, you go 30 or lower,” he said. “I had to retrain myself.”

John reefer truck edited

John also discovered a significant benefit in pulling a reefer in the winter time. “A reefer makes the load heavy, there’s more weight on the axle,” he said. “It helps in the winter, in snow and ice. It keeps me straighter.”

With over a year of experience driving a reefer, John has become accustom to being attentive to the trailer’s temperature gauge as well as its sounds. “If the motor shuts down, I wake up instantly. I keep it running,” he said. “If the green light isn’t on, there’s a problem.”

The seven-year veteran driver offers advice for drivers planning to pull a reefer. “Learn what you are pulling, don’t act like it’s the same equipment. Different trailers will get you hurt,” he cautioned. “With any new type of unit, take your time and be patient. Get used to it, get comfortable with it. Be safe.”

And with 460,000 accident free miles, safety remains at the forefront of John’s mind when driving with J.B. Hunt. “It’s gotta be done safely, done the J.B. way,” he said. He plans on achieving one million safe miles in the next five years and making J.B. Hunt his final career destination. “My wife says that I’m a lifer, she can see me retiring here,” he said.

_____________

Interested in working with a carrier that offers a variety of driving opportunities? Call 1-877-791-9458 to discuss over the roadregional and local truck driving jobs or contract opportunities or fill out a short form online.

Share in top social networks!

No responses yet

Driver of The Year Award Presented to Driver by Son

Driver of The Year Award Presented to Driver by Son

Feb 08 2018

 

local truck driving job

Dedicated J.B. Hunt driver Eric (on left) was presented with the Driver of the Year award by his son Lance (on right), also a dedicated J.B. Hunt driver.

At a young age, in the deserts of California, local J.B. Hunt driver Eric became captivated with truck driving. He would eventually be the only one of three sons to become a truck driver like his father. “When I was 10 years old, I went on a trip with my Dad. It was night time in California and dad let me sit in his lap and drive the truck across the desert. That was cool. I was hooked,” he said.

Eric went on to operate a truck in the Army for seven years, transitioned out and earned his CDL A. He drove commercially for over 30 years and for 10 of those years, he managed a multi-unit operation. “I worked for a man who owned a multi-unit operation; he was an owner operator. I was an operations manager and managed three warehouses and 18 drivers,” he said.

When Eric’s son Lance left the Air Force and earned his CDL A, he came to work for Eric at the multi-unit operation as a regional truck driver. After years of hard labor, long hours and time away from home, it took a toll on Lance and his family. With his father’s blessing, Lance moved on to a local truck driving job with J.B. Hunt. “It was a local position and I knew I could make pretty close, if not equal to my pay. I wouldn’t have to load and unload my trailer. The account has 90% drop and hook and the other deliveries, someone else was loading or unloading,” Lance explained.

A few years later, Eric was burned out from his long hours managing the multi-unit operation and was eager for a local truck driving job too. “I worked 100 hours a week, making $1,200 a week,” he groaned.

His son Lance was enjoying his driving job at J.B. Hunt and connected Eric with management to learn more about driving with the company. Eric was convinced that J.B. Hunt was worth the move. “I could work less hours, make the same, if not more money… I quit my job and came to J.B. Hunt. I was very happy from that day on,” he said.

local truck driving job

Father and son were now company drivers for the same dedicated account. “For a while, it was competitive and then it wasn’t competitive,” Eric explained. “The competitiveness fell off real quick. He’s quicker, younger and does great work… We were both just drivers on the same account.”

“It was easier to work with my dad than for him as my boss,” Lance said with a laugh. “I learned a lot that I know from my dad and over the years, I learned a lot on my own…” The advice continued to be shared years later, even after Lance moved to another dedicated account.

Throughout his 13 years at J.B. Hunt, Eric has been an asset to the dedicated account. He’s known to go above and beyond to coach drivers on how to properly perform pre-trip inspections and search for hard-to-find maintenance issues. He also became a Smith System trainer and enjoys teaching drivers safety standards and practices. “My goal with training is that all drivers are safe drivers,” he said.

Eric’s managers have noticed his strong work ethic and recently awarded him the Southwest Regional Driver of the Month. And with such an accomplishment, he joined a pool of drivers in the running for J.B. Hunt’s DCS Southwest Driver of The Year award. The winner was to be announced at the DCS southwest region’s annual kickoff event in Dallas, Texas.

With his wife and daughter beside him, Eric was among hundreds of excited attendees at the annual kickoff learning what was in store for the DCS division in 2018. Throughout the event, the Driver of the Month recipients were recognized for their hard work and dedication to their jobs and the company. But only one driver could be awarded the Driver of the Year.

“I didn’t know if I’d get it. I was hoping I’d get it. There could be only one winner and I’m sure glad it was me,” Eric explained with amazement still ringing in his voice.

Eric’s name was announced as the crowd roared and confetti fell from the sky. His son Lance presented him with the award and a $5,000 bonus check. “I can’t put one word to it. It was very emotional. To look at my wife, to see her smile and hear her say, ‘Finally’,” Eric said. “This is what a truck driver works for in his career – to be noticed for the work they’ve done by a company like J.B. Hunt. You are the best of the best.”

local truck driving job

The opportunity to present this prestigious award to his father was a privilege Lance will never forget. “It was a really good feeling. The Driver of the Year award is a lot different type of award than winning one million miles. With something like this, other people see your job performance and nominate you. That’s something more special,” he said.

Eric has plans for his future at J.B. Hunt – to put his $5,000 bonus towards retirement and continue to go above and beyond for the company. “It’s been a fantastic career…Thank you to everyone who’s been involved in the past 13 years of it,” he said. “It feels great to work for a company that looks at drivers and gives them a chance for something like this, I thank you for that.”

________________

Are you ready to drive with J.B. Hunt from hire to retire? Call 1-877-791-9458 to discuss over the roadregional and local truck driving jobs or fill out a short form online.

Share in top social networks!

No responses yet

J.B. Hunt Named 2018 Military Friendly Employer By G.I. Jobs

J.B. Hunt Named 2018 Military Friendly Employer By G.I. Jobs

Jan 21 2018

j.b. hunt veteran driver2 (2)
J.B. Hunt was recently recognized for its proven commitment in providing Veterans a smooth transition into civilian truck driving jobs. The carrier was named a 2018 Military Friendly® Employer for the eleventh consecutive year by Victory Media, ranking J.B. Hunt in the top 20% of companies in the industry.

“J.B. Hunt is proud to show our ongoing support of Veterans and their families by maintaining our Military Friendly® Employer designation for more than a decade,” said John Roberts, president and chief executive officer at J.B. Hunt. “We are committed to doing our part for our nation’s military members, including working towards our goal of hiring 10,000 Veterans by 2020.”

According to MilitaryFriendly.com, the designation was determined using data sources from federal agencies, veteran employees, and proprietary survey information from participating organizations. The list was featured in the December issue of G.I. Jobs magazine and the January issue of Military Spouse magazine.

J.B. Hunt’s military hiring program, Hunt’s Heroes, continues to grow and offer more assistance and opportunities to Veterans every year. Since its inception in 2014, the program has expanded its local and regional driving opportunities to Veterans of any military profession and developed an extensive Department of Labor apprenticeship which offers Monthly Housing Allowance payments from the VA to qualified Veterans.

______________________

Interested in driving with a military friendly company? Learn more about our regional and local truck driving jobs for Veterans by visiting DriveJBHunt.com or filling out our short form online.

Share in top social networks!

No responses yet

A New Year, A New Truck Driving Job

A New Year, A New Truck Driving Job

Jan 08 2018

This New Year, are you ready to shift gears in your driving career, and find a truck driving job that better accommodates your life? J.B. Hunt offers numerous career paths that give you a competitive wage and a work-life balance – whether that means being home daily, weekly, or monthly – you choose.

Cruise our various career paths below and click on one to begin your journey towards a new truck driving job at J.B. Hunt.

CDP_1128__Career_Path_Diagram_023

Drive locally and be home daily to spend time with those who matter most.

 

CDP_1128__Career_Path_Diagram_013

With plenty of freight to move all over the country you can admire the hillside, the mountains or the ocean from your cab window when driving over the road.

 

CDP_1128__Career_Path_Diagram_033

With weekly or bi-weekly home time, regional driving offers a balance of driving duties and time off.

 

CDP_1128__Career_Path_Diagram_053

Delivery installation specialists drive a straight truck to deliver and then install appliances, furniture and more at customer locations.

 

CDP_1128__Career_Path_Diagram_043

Choose from over 400 locations around the country! Some of our job opportunities offer relocation packages too.

 

CDP_1128__Career_Path_Diagram_073

While you gain 3 months of experience driving with a CDL A, sign up for Job Alerts to stay in the know regarding openings in your area.

 

_______________

Interested in driving with J.B. Hunt? Visit DriveJBHunt.com or call 1-877-791-9458 to discuss our OTR, regional and local truck driving jobs or fill out a short form online.

Share in top social networks!

No responses yet

Next »